Using your Company’s Website to Enhance your Remote Network

Are you getting everything you can out of your company’s website? Many people make the mistake of assuming that if they or their business don’t specialize in marketing or communications, they don’t need to worry about what their website looks like. In truth, your company’s website is not only a powerful communication tool that can connect you to customers, but it is also a way to help employees enhance the utility of the business’s remote network.

What’s on your Website?

The first step in analyzing additional uses for your company’s website is to take a look at what you have up right now. Did you go fully interactive, with lots of information for potential customers, or do you just have a single home page with your business hours and relevant contact information? The latter is fairly common with smaller companies, but it’s a good idea to take some time to add a layer of depth to your content, even if it’s only a few blog entries or some advice articles. When it comes to boosting the utility of your business network, it also helps to have a section available to employees. This should be placed in an out of the way area of the website so casual customers don’t stumble upon it.


When a Computer Virus Infects a Remote Network

What happens when, no matter how careful you are, a large-scale virus hits your network? Computer security is one of the most important things you can focus on in any business, but even the best security can get compromised. Just as important as knowing how to prevent computer viruses is knowing what you can do when your network becomes infected. With remote networking, where many different devices can be affected, this becomes even more important.

Unique Challenges Facing Remote Networks

The difference in handling a virus between a normal business network and a remote network is the fact that there are many other devices and connections to think about. If you allow employees to network using their own devices, some of them might not be under your control at all. This means that even if you manage to purge the virus fr om your network, you still have to account for the possibility that it might be lurking on a remote machine, ready to re-infect your business. If your business is small enough, you can work around this problem by asking all users to bring their devices in to make sure they are clean. If that isn’t possible, you’ll need to consider other workarounds to make sure you’re safe.


Breaking down the Enthusiasm Barrier and Getting your Employees Interested in Mobile Networking

As strange as it may seem, one of the problems that some companies run into when it comes to creating a remote network is a problem of enthusiasm. Many employees may be intimidated by the idea of networking remotely, especially if they aren’t entirely familiar with mobile devices. Likewise, some supervisors are hesitant to accept the idea of remote work because they can’t monitor an employee’s time. Here are some ways to break down those barriers.

Technological Concerns

Learning a new system can be intimidating, especially as people get older and become more accustomed to the technology that they use on an everyday basis. Because of this, some people may not be willing to make the jump to remote networking because they don’t want to learn more about their mobile devices. Many people purchase mobile devices for one or two tasks, never learning how to use the full array of technology at their fingertips. This barrier can be overcome by connecting with your employees on a personal level when it comes to the technology. By showing them how learning more about a mobile device can benefit them personally, it encourages them to learn more for business.


Making a Comprehensive Network Plan for your Business

Whether you are launching a new business or looking to overhaul your existing business plan, it is very useful to take a look at the way your network is laid out. For many companies, your network is your business. As such, just like you would develop a business plan you should consider making a comprehensive network plan. This plan allows you to identify your network contacts, develop a plan for outages, managing the network on a day to day basis, and much more.

Identify your Applications Early On

If you are starting a new business, you should start by making a list of the applications you need in order to operate on a daily basis. This should include all the software that you use on a regular basis as well as special programs that your specialized employees use. Consider the resources needed to run each of these programs. The amount of resources your software uses will help to determine the hardware you purchase in order to support your operations. It will also help you decide whether or not you should look into setting up a virtual private network, or VPN. It's important to have the software details set before moving forward because that way you don't find yourself scrambling for additional resources.


How Does Heartbleed Affect your Business Network?

The Heartbleed virus has struck websites across the world and put people's online security at risk. While the phenomenon has created a mass panic, there are still a lot of people who don't know what Heartbleed is or how it might affect them. Here's a quick description of what the virus does, how it might affect your network, and what you can do to make sure your business network remains as safe as possible with a minimum of risk moving forward.

What is Heartbleed?

The Heartbleed virus is an exploit that can affect any website or program using OpenSSL cryptography. The program targets the Transport Layer Security, or TLS, protocol. The virus gets its name fr om the fact that it targets the heartbeat extension. The heartbeat extension is a periodic signal sent to the server sent every few seconds to indicate that the user or connected computer is still there. If the heartbeat isn't received, the machine assumes that the connection has failed. By piggybacking onto this protocol, Heartbleed manages to slip in undetected and then transmits personal data, particularly passwords, to the user who sent the virus. This represents a major security breach for many networks.



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