A Top-Down Look at FTP Servers

FTP stands for File Transfer Protocol and is one of the more popular ways to transfer large amounts of data fr om computer to computer. The protocol allows for a variety of different security options, making it less likely that you will experience a loss of information or a breach by hackers. Setting up a server built on FTP can involve a little bit of work, but many businesses benefit from the ease of use and rapid information transfer that such a server offers.

What is the Value of an FTP Server?

An FTP server is not for everybody, but it is a great tool that more and more companies can make use of. People who will get the most use out of an FTP server are the ones who have a lot of files that regularly get passed through their company from day to day. For example, anybody who deals in public relations or photography likely has a large store of files coming in every day that need to be moved and edited by different users. Most servers have a lim it on the number of file transfers that can occur at one time or the size that each file can be at. FTP sidesteps these limits, allowing much larger and many more transfers. Whether you want to move files, media, or software, this is a way to do it quickly.


6 Facts about Remote Networking that Might Surprise You

How much do you really know about remote networking? It has become increasingly common over the past few years, but there are still a lot of myths and misinformation out there. Presented below are some surprising facts about remote networking that you might not have previously been aware of.

1: Virtual Desktops are a Key to the Past

Many people know the frustration of trying to run an old application on Windows 7 or Windows 8 only to discover that the program is no longer supported. Sometimes the developer has released an update, but that upd ate doesn’t always work as effectively as the version you are more familiar with did. Sometimes the product just becomes abandonware and even compatibility mode on Windows can’t run it properly. A way around this problem is the virtual desktop. Remote utilities usually have a mode which adapts any software and runs it as though it were on its native operating system. With a virtual desktop, your favorite apps will never go out of style.


5 Cost-Effective Ways to Improve your Network’s Performance

When a car starts to handle poorly, you bring it in for a tune-up. When a computer starts to slow down, you run it through a number of cleanup processes to speed it up again. Performance problems will eventually strike your business network, even if you are using the best possible setup for your office. When those problems strike, use the tips below to help get your network back up to speed without needing to sink a lot of money into upgrades.

1: Block High-Traffic, Non-Essential Protocols

Sometimes network slowdown is a result of employees not using the resources available to them in the proper manner. You should look into your network usage statistics and pinpoint inefficient protocols. One of the biggest sinners in this regard is peer-to-peer file sharing. While such sharing can be useful in a specific set of circumstances, it is generally an inefficient way to transfer information when compared to other methods. You can manually block certain activities on the network, so putting a cap on peer-to-peer exchanges and other bandwidth-wasting uses of company software is a good start. Just make sure that those using those systems are properly notified so they can find better alternatives.


Remote Utilities 5.6 with iOS/Android support has been released

The first ever mobile version of Remote Utilities - the Viewer for iOS and Android - is available for download. You can now access remote Hosts from your mobile device. Direct and mediated (Internet ID) connections are supported. And, most importantly, the mobile Viewer is absolutely free just like the desktop Viewer.

The Windows version of Remote Utilities has also been improved. Now when you launch the RDP connection mode the program uses the native RDP client. This makes RDP sessions less susceptible to errors and interruptions. In addition, the Agent module can now handle UAC prompts, provided that it is launched under an administrator account.

We have also added 11 new languages for the interface: Arabic, Chinese (Simplified and Traditional), Czech, Danish, Dutch, Italian, Korean, Norwegian, Swedish, and Turkish.

Finally, there are a number of other fixes and improvements. Please, refer to the Version History page for details. This update is free for all users.

Important: for the mobile Viewer to work properly, you must update the Host to version 5.6.

Mobile Viewer: Preview

The Mobile Viewer for Remote Utilities for iOS and Android will be released in just a few days. This post contains a brief overview of the features in the mobile version.

Currently, only the Viewer module is accessible in the mobile version. And the reason for this is simple: a connection from a mobile device to a remote computer is required much more commonly than a connection from a computer to a mobile device.

The application’s interface is simple. When it is launched a window appears with a prompt to enter the IP address or Internet ID of the remote computer. There is a list function with a bookmark feature to save frequently used addresses.

When the Connect button is clicked, a connection is established with the remote computer in Full Control mode. This means the user can see the remote screen, control the cursor and send keystrokes to the remote computer. Currently, the Full Control mode is the only mode in the mobile version. However, in future releases we will add additional modes.


Using Multiple Operating Systems on the Same Network

What’s your preferred operating system? What would you do if somebody told you not to use that operating system? While many people make this adjustment automatically as part of their jobs, there is a growing number of businesses out there that gives their employees freedom to use their operating system of choice. It can be challenging, but it is possible to combine Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux on the same network if that is what you desire.

Why Do This?

Before you start mixing and matching operating systems, it is worth asking why you should bother mixing and matching operating systems on a business network. There are a few reasons to consider this system. It gives employees more comfort with their work computers, since they can use the same settings at work that they use at home. That level of continuity is valuable. It also allows you to tailor your office hardware to the needs of individual employees. For example, an accountant might make the most out of a Windows platform, but a graphic designer might be able to use the strong hardware and rich features available with Mac OS X. It is possible to cater to the needs of both employees.



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